The American School of Classical Studies at Athens
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New Summer Programs

ASCSA SUMMER SEMINARS: APPLICATION DEADLINE, OCTOBER 15, 2016

The new Summer Seminars of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens are two 18-day sessions designed for those who wish to study specific topics in Greece and visit major monuments with exceptional scholars as study leaders, and to improve their understanding of the country’s landscape, history, literature, and culture. Link to brochure.


Greek Sculpture Up Close
(June 12 to June 30, 2017)

Taught by Professor Mark Fullerton, Ohio State University, author of the recent textbook Greek Sculpture, this in-depth examination of archaic and classical statuary will introduce participants to Delphi, Olympia, five Cycladic islands, as well as the Acropolis in Athens. The seminar will visit museums, marble quarries, major sanctuaries, and cemeteries, and students will have an exclusive opportunity to study several newly discovered Greek sculptures. Students will take away a fuller understanding of sculptural styles and the ancient world in which they were created and functioned.

Myth on Site
(July 6 to July 24, 2017)

Seize this opportunity to immerse yourself in Greek mythology within the varied landscape of rural Greece that inspired so many narratives of gods and heroes. Taught by Professor Christina Salowey, Hollins University, a veteran leader of scholarly treks throughout Greece, this seminar will take you to mountain peaks, river valleys, and even the underworld. Students will learn to navigate and interpret ancient sites and understand how Greek myths related to their physical environments.

Internationally known scholars of Greek art and archaeology will participate as guest lecturers in both seminars. Students are expected to give on-site reports which they will prepare in the ASCSA’s libraries. Committed to presenting a comprehensive view of Greece's rich history, these seminars involve long days and extensive walking in the hot Mediterranean climate, and participants should be prepared for a rigorous program of study.


Eligibility: Enrollment is open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students and to high school and college instructors of classics and related subjects and each seminar is limited to twenty participants. The language of instruction is English. Applicants who are not enrolled or teaching at English-speaking colleges, universities, or schools, are required to supply acceptable evidence of proficiency in English.

Cost: Fees for the 2017 seminar program are $2,750. This includes tuition, room for the entire 18-day period, partial board in Athens, travel within Greece, and museum and site fees. International airfare, some meals, and incidental expenses are the participant's responsibility. Inquire about course credit option.

Application: Applicants will complete an online application by October 15. Link to: ASCSA Summer Seminar Application. Students are required to submit legible pdf scans of academic transcripts issued to the candidate as part of application. Applicants arrange for the online submission of two letters of recommendation by sending recommenders this recommendation form before application deadline. Letters of recommendation are due by October 15. Applications accepted for one or both seminars. For more information.

E-mail ssapplication@ascsa.org

All applicants will be notified by mid-November.

  • Meet Marion Meyer, a classical archaeologist who teaches in Vienna but returns to the ASCSA every summer to continue her research on the early cult of Athena.
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  • Outreach News
  • Looking for a lesson plan? A video showing conservation of the beautiful Eutychia mosaic? Check out Corinth Excavation's outreach page.
  • Read More Read More.
  • From the Field
  • Lizzy Ten-Hove expected a crash course in the topography and material culture of ancient Greece. "What I wasn't expecting was everything else!"
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